Climb Up Ye Chillun Climb!

Black

Climb Up Ye Chillun Climb!

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Title: Climb Up Ye Chillun Climb!, Words By: Reginald P. Forrester, Music By: Frank Addis Kent, Published By: Chas. W. Held, Location: Brooklyn NY, Year: 1890


Uncle Tom’s Cabin Rag

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Title: Uncle Tom’s Cabin Rag, Music By: Harry Austin Tierney, Published By: Jos. W. Stern & Co., Location: New York, Year: 1911

Harry Austin Tierney (May 21, 1890 – March 22, 1965) was a successful American composer of musical theatre, best known for long-running hits such as Irene (1919), Broadway’s longest-running show of the era (620 performances), Kid Boots (1923) and Rio Rita (1927), one of the first musicals to be turned into a talking picture (and later remade starring Abbott and Costello).

 


Sumthin Doing

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Title: Sumthin Doin, Composed By: F.H. Losey, Published By: Vandersloot Music Pub. Co., Location Williamsport PA, Year: 1907

Frank Hoyt Losey (March 18, 1870 – 3 May 1931) was an American musician, composer, and arranger of band and orchestra music. He is credited with over 400 compositions and 2,500 arrangements including his most recognized composition, Gloria March.

Vandersloot Music Publishing Company was an American publisher of marches, waltzes, rags, religious music, and popular music of the Tin Pan Alley genre. The firm was founded in 1899 by Frederick William Vandersloot, Jr. (1866–1931) and his brother, Caird Melvill Vandersloot (born 1869). F. W. Vandersloot was a gospel singer, composer, and choir director. In 1913, the firm was based at 233 West 3rd Street, Williamsport, Pennsylvania with an office in New York at 41 W 18th Street, an area ten blocks directly south of what then became known as Tin Pan Alley.

For many years, Harry James Lincoln served as the composer and general manager of Vandersloot Music. Cora E. Vandersloot, née Elwert (1869–1944), wife of F. W. Vandersloot, had also served as president and manager. In 1929, Harry J. Lincoln acquired part of the Vandersloot Music Publishing Company and moved it to Philadelphia and operated it under the same name. When F. W. Vandersloot died in 1931, the firm dissolved, with much of the inventory being acquired by New York publisher Jack Mills.

Frank Hoyt Losey had been a composer and editor-in-chief for the Vandersloot Music Publishing Company.


Rag Baby Rag

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Title: Rag Baby Rag, Composed By: F.H. Losey, Published By: Vandersloot Music Pub. Co., Location: Williamsport PA, Year: 1909

Frank Hoyt Losey (March 18, 1870 – 3 May 1931) was an American musician, composer, and arranger of band and orchestra music. He is credited with over 400 compositions and 2,500 arrangements including his most recognized composition, Gloria March.

Vandersloot Music Publishing Company was an American publisher of marches, waltzes, rags, religious music, and popular music of the Tin Pan Alley genre. The firm was founded in 1899 by Frederick William Vandersloot, Jr. (1866–1931) and his brother, Caird Melvill Vandersloot (born 1869). F. W. Vandersloot was a gospel singer, composer, and choir director. In 1913, the firm was based at 233 West 3rd Street, Williamsport, Pennsylvania with an office in New York at 41 W 18th Street, an area ten blocks directly south of what then became known as Tin Pan Alley.

For many years, Harry James Lincoln served as the composer and general manager of Vandersloot Music. Cora E. Vandersloot, née Elwert (1869–1944), wife of F. W. Vandersloot, had also served as president and manager. In 1929, Harry J. Lincoln acquired part of the Vandersloot Music Publishing Company and moved it to Philadelphia and operated it under the same name. When F. W. Vandersloot died in 1931, the firm dissolved, with much of the inventory being acquired by New York publisher Jack Mills.

Frank Hoyt Losey had been a composer and editor-in-chief for the Vandersloot Music Publishing Company.

 


Pickaninny Blues

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Title: Pickaninny Blues, Lyrics By: Harold G. Frost, Music By: F. Henri Klickmann, Published By: McKinley Music Co., Location: Chicago/New York, Year: 1919

Due to his extremely early presence in the recording industry, F. Henri Klickmann is sometimes mistaken for a pre-technology human version of the “click track.” Sometimes credited with the full Frank Henri Klickmann, this artist took care of the full package, not just the rhythm. He composed, arranged, and orchestrated pop music well before the term was invented, a detail that helps explain the lack of information available about Klickmann in proportion to the works he published. He was well established as a peddler of songs by the Roaring Twenties, having already cashed in on the sinking of the Titanic with “My Sweetheart Went Down with the Ship” in 1912. Of course, Klickmann had been in on ragtime as early as 1910, showing a flair for titles bordering on the downright inebriated: “Knockout Drops: A Trombone Jag” and “Delirium Tremens Rag: A Trombone Spasm” are good examples. The early development of jazz was an interest he helped document with efforts such as a 1915 publication of “Jelly Roll Blues.” Some of this artist’s work was quite ambitious. Klickmann scribbled a set of pieces for accordion and completed a concerto for tenor saxophone soloist in a style blending Sousa and Debussy. Ragtime maestro Zez Confrey used Klickmann as an arranger for his own complex set of piano pieces. During the ’40s and ’50s, Klickmann co-led combos with trombonist and arranger Fred Norman, backing singers Irene Redfield and Millie Bosman.


The Cotton Pickers

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Title: The Cotton Pickers, Composed By: Chas. S. Tarbox, Published By: McKinley Music Co., Location: Chicago/New York, Year: 1899

 


A Coon Lullaby

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Title: A Coon Lullaby, Words By: Mina McDonnell, Music By: Louie Heath, Published By: Marriott & Williams, Location: London, Year: 1901


The School Girl Lancers

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Title: The School Girl Lancers, Melody By: Leslie Stuart, Arranged By: Warwick Williams, Published By: Francis, Day & Hunter, Location: London, Year: 1904

Leslie Stuart (15 March 1863 – 27 March 1928) was an English composer of Edwardian musical comedy, best known for the hit show Florodora (1899) and many popular songs.

The School Girl is an Edwardian musical comedy, in two acts, composed by Leslie Stuart (with additional songs by Paul Rubens) with a book by Henry Hamilton and Paul M. Potter, and lyrics by Charles H. Taylor and others. It concerns a French school girl from a convent, who goes to Paris to help her lovesick friend. Through mistaken identity, she learns secrets that help her at the Paris stock exchange and ends up at a students’ ball in the Latin Quarter. All ends happily.

The musical was first produced in 1903 by George Edwardes and Charles Frohman at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London and ran for 333 performances there. It starred Edna May, Marie Studholme and Billie Burke. George Grossmith, Jr. succeeded G P Huntley as Ormsby St. Ledger. The show also played successfully on Broadway in 1904, with May and Grossmith, and on the national and international touring circuits.

The most famous song from this show was “My Little Canoe.”

 


Ten Little Darkies Juvenile Quadrille

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Title: Ten Little Darkies Juvenile Quadrille, Written By: D. Tucker, Published By: Metzler & Co., Location: London, Year: 1869


The Prince of Wales

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Title: The Prince of Wales, Written By: Theo. Bonheur, Published By: J.H. Larway, Location: London, Year: 1860

 


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About The Curator

Carol Seelig Eastman is the Executive Director and Chief Curator of The Knohl Collection. In this role, she passionately explores the artist’s personal, social, and political world and places their art in a meaningful historical context. Her thematic exhibitions provide visual and educational stimulation that attract and engage a diverse museum audience.